Tag Archives: pythagoras

Deriving the formula for an ellipse

In this post, I’ll be demonstrating how one can derive the formula for an ellipse from absolute scratch.

To derive the formula for an ellipse, what we must first do is create a diagram like the one below.

Ellipse diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

** Click on the image above to see it in full size.

Now, the first thing we’ve got to acknowledge here is that:

{ D }_{ 1 }+{ D }_{ 2 }=2a

What we’re basically saying is that D_1 + D_2 is equal to the length from -a to a in the diagram above.

This formula can be understood by watching the video below…

These photographs can also help the formula sink into your mind…

Ellipse Image 1:

Ellipse Image 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellipse Image 2:

Ellipse Image 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, look at the diagram at the top of this page once again…

What you will notice is that:

{ \left( c+x \right) }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 }={ D }_{ 1 }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { D }_{ 1 }^{ 2 }={ c }^{ 2 }+2cx+{ x }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { D }_{ 1 }=\sqrt { { c }^{ 2 }+2cx+{ x }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 } } \\ \\ { \left( c-x \right) }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 }={ D }_{ 2 }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { D }_{ 2 }^{ 2 }={ c }^{ 2 }-2cx+{ x }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { D }_{ 2 }=\sqrt { { c }^{ 2 }-2cx+{ x }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 } }

If this is the case, we can say that:

part of ellipse workings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

** Click on the image of the workings to see it in full size.

Alright, so far so good… Now, it turns out – if you look at the diagram at the top of this page carefully, you will discover that:

{ b }^{ 2 }+{ c }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { c }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 2 }-{ b }^{ 2 }

And this ultimately means that:

{ a }^{ 4 }+\left( { a }^{ 2 }-{ b }^{ 2 } \right) { x }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 2 }\left( { a }^{ 2 }-{ b }^{ 2 } \right) +{ a }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { a }^{ 4 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }-{ b }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 4 }-{ a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ -{ b }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }=-{ a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ { b }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \frac { { b }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 } }{ { a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 } } +\frac { { a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 } }{ { a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 } } =\frac { { a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 } }{ { a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 } } \\ \\ \frac { { x }^{ 2 } }{ { a }^{ 2 } } +\frac { { y }^{ 2 } }{ { b }^{ 2 } } =1\\ \\ { \left( \frac { x }{ a } \right) }^{ 2 }+{ \left( \frac { y }{ b } \right) }^{ 2 }=1

The formula you see just above is the formula for an ellipse. You’ve derived it from scratch!!

Finding the formulas for areas of triangles

In this post I’ll be demonstrating how one can derive the three formulas which can be used to find the areas of triangles.

These formulas are in fact:

A=\frac { 1 }{ 2 } bc\cdot \sin { \left( A \right) } =\frac { 1 }{ 2 } ac\cdot \sin { \left( B \right) =\frac { 1 }{ 2 } } ab\cdot \sin { \left( C \right) }

To begin with, let’s start by looking at the diagram below:

Triangle Diagram

Now, if you look at the diagram carefully – you will notice that the area of the triangle is:

A=\frac { x\cdot CN }{ 2 } +\frac { \left( c-x \right) \cdot CN }{ 2 }

This can be simplified into:

\frac { x\cdot CN }{ 2 } +\frac { \left( c-x \right) \cdot CN }{ 2 } \\ \\ =\frac { x\cdot CN+\left( c-x \right) \cdot CN }{ 2 } \\ \\ =\frac { CN\left\{ x+\left( c-x \right) \right\} }{ 2 } \\ \\ =\frac { CN\cdot c }{ 2 }

Because of SOH CAH TOA, what we can also say is that:

\sin { \left( A \right) } =\frac { O }{ H } =\frac { CN }{ b } \\ \\ \therefore \quad b\cdot \sin { \left( A \right) } =CN\\ \\ \sin { \left( B \right) =\frac { O }{ H } } =\frac { CN }{ a } \\ \\ \therefore \quad a\cdot \sin { \left( B \right) } =CN

Now because:

A=\frac { CN\cdot c }{ 2 }

This ultimately means that:

A=\frac { 1 }{ 2 } bc\cdot \sin { \left( A \right) } \\ \\ A=\frac { 1 }{ 2 } ac\cdot \sin { \left( B \right) } \\ \\ \therefore \quad A=\frac { 1 }{ 2 } bc\cdot \sin { \left( A \right) =\frac { 1 }{ 2 } ac } \cdot \sin { \left( B \right) }

Alright, so far so good… Now we must put the icing on the cake and attach the final piece of the jigsaw puzzle to the formula above. In order to find the three equations which can be used to find the areas of triangles, we must now discover the expression for sin(C). We can discover its expression by first saying that:

C=\left( 90-A \right) +\left( 90-B \right) \\ \\ =90-A+90-B\\ \\ =180-A-B\\ \\ =180-\left( A+B \right) \\ \\ \therefore \quad \sin { \left( C \right) } =\sin { \left( 180-\left( A+B \right) \right) }

And if we use the trigonometric identity below:

\sin { \left( \alpha -\beta \right) } =\sin { \left( \alpha \right) \cdot \cos { { \left( \beta \right) } } -\cos { \left( \alpha \right) \cdot \sin { \left( \beta \right) } } }

We will reach the conclusion:

\sin { \left( 180-\left( A+B \right) \right) } =\sin { \left( 180 \right) \cdot \cos { \left( A+B \right) -\cos { \left( 180 \right) \cdot \sin { \left( A+B \right) } } } } 

But because:

\sin { \left( 180 \right) =0 } ,\quad \cos { \left( 180 \right) =-1 } \\ \\ \sin { \left( 180-\left( A+B \right) \right) =-\left( -1 \right) \cdot \sin { \left( A+B \right) } } \\ \\ \therefore \quad \sin { \left( C \right) =\sin { \left( A+B \right) } }

Now, sin(A+B) as a trigonometric identity, is:

\sin { \left( A+B \right) =\sin { \left( A \right) \cdot \cos { \left( B \right) +\cos { \left( A \right) \cdot \sin { \left( B \right) } } } } }

And, thanks to SOH CAH TOA…

\sin { \left( A+B \right) =\sin { \left( C \right) } } \\ \\ \sin { \left( A \right) =\frac { CN }{ b } } \\ \\ \cos { \left( B \right) =\frac { A }{ H } } =\frac { \left( c-x \right) }{ a } \\ \\ \cos { \left( A \right) =\frac { A }{ H } =\frac { x }{ b } } \\ \\ \sin { \left( B \right) =\frac { CN }{ a } }

Which means that…

\sin { \left( C \right) =\frac { CN }{ b } \cdot \frac { \left( c-x \right) }{ a } +\frac { x }{ b } \cdot \frac { CN }{ a } } \\ \\ =\frac { CN\left( c-x \right) }{ ab } +\frac { CN\cdot x }{ ab } \\ \\ =\frac { CN\left( c-x \right) +CN\cdot x }{ ab } \\ \\ =\frac { CN\left\{ \left( c-x \right) +x \right\} }{ ab } \\ \\ =\frac { CN\cdot c }{ ab } \\ \\ \therefore \quad ab\cdot \sin { \left( C \right) =CN\cdot c } \\ \\ \therefore \quad \frac { 1 }{ 2 } ab\cdot \sin { \left( C \right) =\frac { CN\cdot c }{ 2 } =A }

As this is the case, we can conclude that:

A=\frac { 1 }{ 2 } bc\cdot \sin { \left( A \right) } =\frac { 1 }{ 2 } ac\cdot \sin { \left( B \right) =\frac { 1 }{ 2 } } ab\cdot \sin { \left( C \right) }

How to derive the formula for a circle from scratch

If you’d like to derive the formula for a circle from absolute scratch, then your best option would be to draw a diagram such as the one below:

formula for a circle
A circle on the x, y plane.

If you look at this diagram carefully, what you will notice is:

  • A circle exists and each point on this circle has the coordinate (x, y).
  • The centre of the circle can be found at (a, b).
  • The circle has a radius ‘r’.
  • The right angled triangles in the diagram each have an adjacent length, opposite length and hypotenuse (r).

Once you’ve prepared a similar diagram, your next aim should be to turn your attention towards the right angled triangles which exist within the circle. You should also think about the many different right angled triangles which could fit within the circle provided they emanate from the centre point (a, b).

The reason I’ve mentioned these right angled triangles is because according to Pythagoras’ theorem, when you have a right angled triangle – its adjacent length squared plus its opposite length squared is equal to the length of its hypotenuse squared:

Adjacent²+Opposite²=Hypotenuse²

Now, in this case – the adjacent lengths of the right angled triangles which can fit within the circle on the diagram can be described using the expression:

\left( x-a \right)  or \left| x-a \right|

The opposite lengths can be described using the expression:

\left( y-b \right)  or \left| y-b \right| 

Also, very interestingly:

  • Each of the right angled triangles you can think of has a hypotenuse ‘r’.
  • { \left( x-a \right)  }^{ 2 }={ \left| x-a \right|  }^{ 2 }
  • { \left( y-b \right)  }^{ 2 }={ \left| y-b \right|  }^{ 2 }

When you combine all the information above, what you get is a neat formula which looks like this:

{ \left( x-a \right)  }^{ 2 }+{ \left( y-b \right)  }^{ 2 }={ r }^{ 2 }

And it turns out… This is the formula for a circle on the x, y plane, whereby, (a, b) is the centre of the circle and ‘r’ is the length of its radius. How spectacular is that? 🙂

2 ways to derive Pythagoras’ equation from scratch

The other day I discovered one more way to derive Pythagoras’ equation from scratch, completely by accident. I was deriving Pythagoras’ equation using the usual method, whilst navigating  a diagram similar to the one below, but without (B-A) measurements…

pythagoras' diagram

*Note (regarding diagram above): x+y = 90 degrees

The usual method goes like this…

The area of the largest square is:

{ \left( A+B \right)  }^{ 2 }

It is also:

4\cdot \frac { 1 }{ 2 } AB+{ C }^{ 2 }

Which means that:

{ \left( A+B \right)  }^{ 2 }=4\cdot \frac { 1 }{ 2 } AB+{ C }^{ 2 }\\ \\ { A }^{ 2 }+2AB+{ B }^{ 2 }=2AB+{ C }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { A }^{ 2 }+{ B }^{ 2 }={ C }^{ 2 }

Now, when I added the lengths (B-A) to my diagram, which are included in the diagram above, I discovered a new way to derive Pythagoras’ equation…

I did this by focusing on the area C^2. It turns out that:

4\cdot \frac { 1 }{ 2 } AB+{ \left( B-A \right)  }^{ 2 }={ C }^{ 2 }

And since:

{ \left( B-A \right)  }^{ 2 }\\ \\ ={ \left( A+B \right)  }^{ 2 }-4AB\\ \\ ={ A }^{ 2 }+2AB+{ B }^{ 2 }-4AB\\ \\ ={ B }^{ 2 }-2AB+{ A }^{ 2 }

I was able to say that:

4\cdot \frac { 1 }{ 2 } AB+\left\{ { B }^{ 2 }-2AB+{ A }^{ 2 } \right\} ={ C }^{ 2 }\\ \\ 2AB+{ B }^{ 2 }-2AB+{ A }^{ 2 }={ C }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { A }^{ 2 }+{ B }^{ 2 }={ C }^{ 2 }

Obviously, I was quite pleased. Have you discovered other ways in which to derive Pythagoras’ equation??


Related:

Video on how to come up with Pythagoras’s equation…

How To Come Up With Pythagoras’s Equation