Category Archives: Proofs

Another way to express the golden ratio mathematically

In this post I’m going to be proving that…

\varphi =\frac { 1+\sqrt { 5 } }{ 2 } =1+\frac { 1 }{ 1+\frac { 1 }{ 1+\frac { 1 }{ 1+... } } }

So, here I go…

x=\frac { 1+\sqrt { 5 } }{ 2 } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }=\frac { \left( 1+\sqrt { 5 } \right) }{ 2 } \cdot \frac { \left( 1+\sqrt { 5 } \right) }{ 2 } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }=\frac { 1+2\sqrt { 5 } +5 }{ 4 } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }=\frac { 6+2\sqrt { 5 } }{ 4 } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }-1=\frac { 6+2\sqrt { 5 } }{ 4 } -\frac { 4 }{ 4 } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }-1=\frac { 2+2\sqrt { 5 } }{ 4 } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }-1=\frac { 2 }{ 2 } \cdot \frac { \left( 1+\sqrt { 5 } \right) }{ 2 }

Wait for it…

\Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }-1=1\cdot x\\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }-1=x\\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad { x }^{ 2 }=x+1\\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad \frac { { x }^{ 2 } }{ x } =\frac { x }{ x } +\frac { 1 }{ x } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad x=1+\frac { 1 }{ x } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad \frac { 1+\sqrt { 5 } }{ 2 } =1+\frac { 1 }{ x } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad \frac { 1+\sqrt { 5 } }{ 2 } =1+\frac { 1 }{ \left( 1+\frac { 1 }{ x } \right) } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad \frac { 1+\sqrt { 5 } }{ 2 } =1+\frac { 1 }{ 1+\frac { 1 }{ x } } \\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad \frac { 1+\sqrt { 5 } }{ 2 } =1+\frac { 1 }{ 1+\frac { 1 }{ \left( 1+\frac { 1 }{ x } \right) } } \\ \\ \therefore \quad \frac { 1+\sqrt { 5 } }{ 2 } =1+\frac { 1 }{ 1+\frac { 1 }{ 1+\frac { 1 }{ 1+... } } }

This expression for the golden ratio is quite common, however, before I produced this post – I think it would’ve been very hard to figure out how to derive it from scratch. There aren’t many quirky proofs like this one on the internet – I am quite certain. I hope you liked reading this post! 😀

Deriving the formula for an ellipse

In this post, I’ll be demonstrating how one can derive the formula for an ellipse from absolute scratch.

To derive the formula for an ellipse, what we must first do is create a diagram like the one below.

Ellipse diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

** Click on the image above to see it in full size.

Now, the first thing we’ve got to acknowledge here is that:

{ D }_{ 1 }+{ D }_{ 2 }=2a

What we’re basically saying is that D_1 + D_2 is equal to the length from -a to a in the diagram above.

This formula can be understood by watching the video below…

These photographs can also help the formula sink into your mind…

Ellipse Image 1:

Ellipse Image 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellipse Image 2:

Ellipse Image 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, look at the diagram at the top of this page once again…

What you will notice is that:

{ \left( c+x \right) }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 }={ D }_{ 1 }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { D }_{ 1 }^{ 2 }={ c }^{ 2 }+2cx+{ x }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { D }_{ 1 }=\sqrt { { c }^{ 2 }+2cx+{ x }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 } } \\ \\ { \left( c-x \right) }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 }={ D }_{ 2 }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { D }_{ 2 }^{ 2 }={ c }^{ 2 }-2cx+{ x }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { D }_{ 2 }=\sqrt { { c }^{ 2 }-2cx+{ x }^{ 2 }+{ y }^{ 2 } }

If this is the case, we can say that:

part of ellipse workings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

** Click on the image of the workings to see it in full size.

Alright, so far so good… Now, it turns out – if you look at the diagram at the top of this page carefully, you will discover that:

{ b }^{ 2 }+{ c }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { c }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 2 }-{ b }^{ 2 }

And this ultimately means that:

{ a }^{ 4 }+\left( { a }^{ 2 }-{ b }^{ 2 } \right) { x }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 2 }\left( { a }^{ 2 }-{ b }^{ 2 } \right) +{ a }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { a }^{ 4 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }-{ b }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 4 }-{ a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ -{ b }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }=-{ a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 }\\ \\ { b }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 }+{ a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 }={ a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \frac { { b }^{ 2 }{ x }^{ 2 } }{ { a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 } } +\frac { { a }^{ 2 }{ y }^{ 2 } }{ { a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 } } =\frac { { a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 } }{ { a }^{ 2 }{ b }^{ 2 } } \\ \\ \frac { { x }^{ 2 } }{ { a }^{ 2 } } +\frac { { y }^{ 2 } }{ { b }^{ 2 } } =1\\ \\ { \left( \frac { x }{ a } \right) }^{ 2 }+{ \left( \frac { y }{ b } \right) }^{ 2 }=1

The formula you see just above is the formula for an ellipse. You’ve derived it from scratch!!

Proof: Thales’ Theorem

In this post I’ll be demonstrating how you can prove that Thales’ Theorem is true. To follow the steps in this post (11 in total), what you will require is a ruler, pair of compasses and a pencil.

Step 1: Draw a random line on a sheet of paper.

Random line....

Step 2: Place your compass needle on this line, and form a circle.

A circle...

Step 3: Add 4 points to your drawing, as shown below…

Add 4 points to your drawing....

Step 4: Name the points A, B, C and D as shown…

Points A, B, C and D

Step 5: Connect the points A, B and D together to form an isosceles triangle

Points A, B and D connected.

Step 6: Name the lines AB and BD the radius (r)…

Label the radiuses...

Step 7: Since the lines AB and BD are equal to one another, it follows that the angles ∠BAD and ∠BDA are equivalent. This is because the angles below the apex of an isosceles triangle are equal. You must name these angles alpha (α).

Label alpha angles...

Step 8: Now connect the points BC and CD together to form another isosceles triangle…

Another isosceles triangle...

Step 9: The line BC is equal to r… Now label the line BC…

Label the line BC...

Step 10: Because the line BC and BD are both equal to r, the triangle BCD is an isosceles triangle. This means that the angles ∠BCD and ∠BDC must both be equivalent. Call these angles beta (β).

Label the angles beta...

Step 11: Prove that the angle at point D is equal to 90 degrees.

Thales’ Theorem is as follows:

Because AC is the diameter of the circle you drew, the angle at the point D (α+β) must be equal to 90 degrees. In more specific and general terms, if you have the points A, C and D lying on a circle – and the line AC is in fact the diameter of this circle – then the angle at point D (α+β) must be a right angle.

Proof (which must be derived using the diagram you’ve created):

Diagram.

All angles within a triangle (in 2 space) must add up to 180 degrees.

Mathematically, this means that:

\alpha +\alpha +\beta +\beta =180\\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad 2\alpha +2\beta =180\\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad 2\left( \alpha +\beta  \right) =180\\ \\ \Rightarrow \quad \frac { 2\left( \alpha +\beta  \right)  }{ 2 } =\frac { 180 }{ 2 } \\ \\ \therefore \quad \alpha +\beta =90

And as a result, Thales’ theorem must be true. The angle α+β is the angle at point D.

2 ways to derive Pythagoras’ equation from scratch

The other day I discovered one more way to derive Pythagoras’ equation from scratch, completely by accident. I was deriving Pythagoras’ equation using the usual method, whilst navigating  a diagram similar to the one below, but without (B-A) measurements…

pythagoras' diagram

*Note (regarding diagram above): x+y = 90 degrees

The usual method goes like this…

The area of the largest square is:

{ \left( A+B \right)  }^{ 2 }

It is also:

4\cdot \frac { 1 }{ 2 } AB+{ C }^{ 2 }

Which means that:

{ \left( A+B \right)  }^{ 2 }=4\cdot \frac { 1 }{ 2 } AB+{ C }^{ 2 }\\ \\ { A }^{ 2 }+2AB+{ B }^{ 2 }=2AB+{ C }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { A }^{ 2 }+{ B }^{ 2 }={ C }^{ 2 }

Now, when I added the lengths (B-A) to my diagram, which are included in the diagram above, I discovered a new way to derive Pythagoras’ equation…

I did this by focusing on the area C^2. It turns out that:

4\cdot \frac { 1 }{ 2 } AB+{ \left( B-A \right)  }^{ 2 }={ C }^{ 2 }

And since:

{ \left( B-A \right)  }^{ 2 }\\ \\ ={ \left( A+B \right)  }^{ 2 }-4AB\\ \\ ={ A }^{ 2 }+2AB+{ B }^{ 2 }-4AB\\ \\ ={ B }^{ 2 }-2AB+{ A }^{ 2 }

I was able to say that:

4\cdot \frac { 1 }{ 2 } AB+\left\{ { B }^{ 2 }-2AB+{ A }^{ 2 } \right\} ={ C }^{ 2 }\\ \\ 2AB+{ B }^{ 2 }-2AB+{ A }^{ 2 }={ C }^{ 2 }\\ \\ \therefore \quad { A }^{ 2 }+{ B }^{ 2 }={ C }^{ 2 }

Obviously, I was quite pleased. Have you discovered other ways in which to derive Pythagoras’ equation??


Related:

Video on how to come up with Pythagoras’s equation…

How To Come Up With Pythagoras’s Equation

Cosine Rule Mastery – PDF Download

You can now find out how to derive the 3 main cosine rule formulas through a new document that I’ve created called “Cosine Rule Mastery“.

This document can be downloaded free of charge along with “Sine Rule Mastery” which is another document that explains in detail how to come up with the sine rule formula.

If you’re interested in downloading one or both of these documents, please visit this link: http://mathsvideos.net/free-resources-downloads/.

I’d also like to talk about a new video I’ve created (posted below). It’s related to a 4 dimensional hypercube and learning how to train your mind to see things from different mathematical perspectives.

Prior to posting up the video above, I did create another similar video. In the video below, you will see me split a prism into 3 equal parts. This video will interest those who’d like to find the volume of a square based pyramid.