Proving that arg(z_1/z_2)=arg(z_1)-arg(z_2)

In this post I’ll be proving to you that:

arg\left( \frac { { z }_{ 1 } }{ { z }_{ 2 } } \right) =arg\left( { z }_{ 1 } \right) -arg\left( { z }_{ 2 } \right)

Now firstly I will have to say that:

{ z }_{ 1 }={ r }_{ 1 }\left( \cos { { \theta }_{ 1 }+i\sin { { \theta }_{ 1 } } } \right) \\ \\ \therefore \quad arg\left( { z }_{ 1 } \right) ={ \theta }_{ 1 }

And also that:

{ z }_{ 2 }={ r }_{ 2 }\left( \cos { { \theta }_{ 2 }+i\sin { { \theta }_{ 2 } } } \right) \\ \\ \therefore \quad arg\left( { z }_{ 2 } \right) ={ \theta }_{ 2 }

If this is the case, then…

z_1 divided by z_2

Since this is in the form:

z=r\left( \cos { \theta +i\sin { \theta } } \right)

I would have to conclude that:

arg\left( \frac { { z }_{ 1 } }{ { z }_{ 2 } } \right) ={ \theta }_{ 1 }-{ \theta }_{ 2 }=arg\left( { z }_{ 1 } \right) -arg\left( { z }_{ 2 } \right)

Hence I’ve proven that:

arg\left( \frac { { z }_{ 1 } }{ { z }_{ 2 } } \right) =arg\left( { z }_{ 1 } \right) -arg\left( { z }_{ 2 } \right)

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